33⅓ Book Series Celebrates 10th Anniversary With Michael Jackson’s “Dangerous” By Susan Fast

Sources: La Times – By Amy Benfer| Edits By – All Things Michael

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Sales of vinyl records began plummeting in the last decades of the 20th century, and by 2004, they were virtually considered a dead medium. That’s the year David Barker began to publish a series of miniature books under the name 33 1/3.

A Brit with a doctorate working for an academic press, Barker named his project after the speed of an LP and created a model for a writer to extract meaning from a single album per book by any means necessary — reporting, criticism, fiction, memoir.

Vinyl’s looming obsolescence made it the perfect fetish object as the last generation of record collectors — roughly those who came of age during the punk and post-punk years of the late ’70s through the mid-’80s — became nostalgic for the music of their youth, a demographic that includes Barker, who “grew up in the 1980s on a hard-core diet of the NME and Melody Maker.”

To those people, 33 1/3 — which will celebrate its 10th anniversary in September with its 100th title (Michael Jackson’s “Dangerous” by Susan Fast) — offered everything Barker thought was missing from music in the digital era: affirmation of the belief that an album is not a collection of music tracks but a painstakingly sequenced narrative that rewards careful, repeated listening. It was also a category of objects that could be owned, curated and displayed.

A decade later, vinyl records have become the only musical medium to sharply increase in sales, driven largely by reissues of many of the bands covered by 33 1/3 as well as a freshly discovered love of the medium from a new generation of artists.

“I would love to say that the 33 1/3 series is solely responsible for the resurgence of vinyl,” says Ally Jane Grossan, who has edited the series since Barker left in January 2013.

But she admits the truth is probably just that the books appeal to the same audience: obsessive, rabid collectors. “The same person who will want to display their hundred favorite records in their living room will want to display their 33 1/3 collection right alongside them.” Slim, with elegant, minimalist covers, they are as portable as an iPod and much cooler for those who wish to advertise their musical tastes.

Barker had stumbled upon a built-in audience: Commercial trade publishers were interested only in publishing music biographies of superstars like Nirvana and U2. But the same fans who support artists on indie labels like Sub Pop, Merge and Creation could support a small academic press like Continuum, who, as Grossan points out, considered 10,000 copies a decent print run and 20,000 copies a blockbuster.

Music critics found the series an essential outlet for long-form writing and creative experimentation, says Maura Johnston, former music editor of the Village Voice and current editor of Maura magazine. “I love how some authors have run with it,” she says, citing Franklin Bruno’s take on Elvis Costello’s “Armed Forces” (No. 21, 2005), which presents each topic glossary-style, in alphabetical order, and Carl Wilson’s “Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste” (No. 52, 2007), which begins with Wilson’s attempt to explain why he so despises the music of Celine Dion and ends up as a meditation on taste.

Johnston does, however, see a “definite bent towards ‘canon’ artists and bands.” She started a conversation on social media this year about the series’ lack of coverage of female writers and artists and says she would also love to see more R&B. “There are so many stories in music waiting to be told, and quite a few of them live at the fringes,” she said.

Music critics found the series an essential outlet for long-form writing and creative experimentation, says Maura Johnston, former music editor of the Village Voice and current editor of Maura magazine. “I love how some authors have run with it,” she says, citing Franklin Bruno’s take on Elvis Costello’s “Armed Forces” (No. 21, 2005), which presents each topic glossary-style, in alphabetical order, and Carl Wilson’s “Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste” (No. 52, 2007), which begins with Wilson’s attempt to explain why he so despises the music of Celine Dion and ends up as a meditation on taste.

Johnston does, however, see a “definite bent towards ‘canon’ artists and bands.” She started a conversation on social media this year about the series’ lack of coverage of female writers and artists and says she would also love to see more R&B. “There are so many stories in music waiting to be told, and quite a few of them live at the fringes,” she said.

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This ‘Dancing With the Stars’ Contestant Danced With Michael Jackson

Sources: 2 Paragraphs | Edited By – All Things Michael

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The full list of stars to compete on Season 19 of Dancing With The Stars will be revealed September 4 on Good Morning America. However, a list of names has been leaked. It includes comedian Tommy Chong of Cheech and Chong, Duck Dynasty’s Sadie Robertson, Pretty Little Liars’ Janel Parrish, fashion designer Betsey Johnson, and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’s Alfonso Ribeiro (Carlton), among others.

Ribeiro has a huge advantage. He’s a professional dancer. Or at least he used to be. Once a dancer, always a dancer – isn’t that what Fred Astaire said? As a child, Ribeiro moonwalked with Michael Jackson (and the rest of the Jackson Five) in a 1984 Pepsi commercial. Wearing the iconic red leather jacket, black loafers and sequined glove, Ribeiro looks like a mini-me of the King of Pop.

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Check it out.

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Dance Group Boyband Performs Remix Medley For Sky One’s “Got To Dance”

Sources: Ilford Recorder – By Ajar Nair | All Things Michael

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A teenage dance prodigy and his crew has missed out on the top prize of £250,000 on a TV talent show after making it to the final.

Mike McNeish, 18, of Hainault – one-fifth of dance group Boyband – impressed on Sky One’s Got To Dance contest but didn’t make the final cut on Friday’s episode.

The dance collective put together a slick routine to a musical medley including Disclosure and Sam Smith’s Latch and a Jackson 5 I Want You Back remix.

Nine acts made it to the final, with a top three – including eventual winners Duplic8 – being selected by judges.

The boys impressed judge and dance group Diversity founder Ashley Banjo earlier in the competition and made it to Team Ashley.

Mike said: “Working with Ashley has been amazing he’s taught us some great stuff. Being on the show was a fun experience, we met a lot of amazing people and we just had a good time.”

Boyband faced highs and lows on the show as they lost group member Corey Culverwell to an injury while rehearsing.

Mike added: “Me and the boys are really strong – it was disappointing to not win but it happens and we’ve got to get on with it as a crew.

“We’re definitely much closer and tighter as friends now.”

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Long Live The King!

Sources: DNA India – By Shannon Pereira | All Things Michael

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On Michael Jackson’s birth anniversary, Bandra resident Shannon Pereira of Shannon & The Silent Riot, talks about MJ’s influence on his musical journey.

A guitar being plugged into massive speakers…LOUD (turning the volume knob)… LOUDER… ARE YOU NUTS?!! Followed by a child actor’s epic words, “Eat This!” and striking a power cord, which catapults his father right up in the sky, only to land in Africa between a hunters’ dance party.

I was five and the above picturisation (of MJ’s song Black or White) is one of my earliest memories of Michael Jackson. When approached to do this mini-tribute, my memories rushed back to all the MJ videos I used to watch as a kid. I would stop everything to watch MJ on television, probably just the way he did to watch James Brown.

MJ seemed to have it right with every single thing—the beats, catchy lyrics, the moves! And let’s not forget his trademark fashion—jackets, ankle pants, white socks. He was driven by his hunger to learn, to constantly top himself and be the best. He was a shy, soft-spoken personality, but when he hit the stage he was a riot. He electrified his audience with signature dance moves—the robot, moonwalk, anti-gravity lean.

Apart from being a musical great, MJ was also a philanthropist and a humanitarian. He was dedicated to many causes, right from children to the environment and that is inspiring too.

Recently, I had the privilege to pay a tribute to MJ and it was one of my best experiences. It made me push myself beyond known boundaries. Firstly, I picked out the best songs. Then, I planned out the show just like Michael would have done it. Given another chance, I know that I would do it better, because just like MJ, I’m a perfectionist.

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Even in the music I write, my arrangements work on the formula I’ve derived from all those years of following MJ’s music. His This is It documentary has had the biggest impact on my life and I wish that the tour had really happened. His book Moonwalk remains close to my heart. Man in the Mirror is like an anthem to me.

 

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Raising A Toast To The King of Pop

Sources: DNA India – By Vivaan Kapoori| All Things Michael

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On Michael Jackson’s birth anniversary, Nepean Sea Road resident and drummer Vivaan Kapoor, talks about MJ’s influence on his musical journey.

Michael Jackson was my first window into the music world. I started playing drums when I was three; I learned to play by simply watching a video of one of my favourite albums of all time, Michael Jackson’s Dangerous. His music has such an edge to it that even today it inspires me just as much as it did 19 years ago. As a drummer, listening to his music pushed me to try and experiment a little more in every groove that I played, much like Michael Jackson did with every song.

I recall an amusing incident as a child; after seeing Michael Jackson’s iconic music video for Earth Song, I would spend hours in the sandpit at Joggers Park pouring sand on my head, imitating my hero and thoroughly embarrassing my grandmother.

The first live concert I ever attended was of Michael Jackson himself at the Andheri Sports Complex in 1996, which I still remember to this day—I still have my concert ticket! When Michael Jackson announced his This is It tour back in 2009, I was jubilant to know that after what seemed like an eternity, I would see him take the stage once again, and that too at London’s incredible O2 arena. Little did I know that I would hear of his untimely death just a month later. To me, that has been the greatest loss of the music industry. When the film of what-the-tour-would-have-been was released in October 2009, I saw it three times! And even today, when I’m working on a new song and need fresh inspiration, this DVD comes to my rescue.

Michael Jackson is my greatest musical influence and will forever be my reason for being a music lover. If I could change one thing, it would be to get Michael Jackson back and wish him a ‘Happy Birthday’ today.

Vivaan Kapoor, a prolific drummer and percussionist, has been playing drums since the age of five. Being completely self-taught, he has performed with a number of artists such as Spud in the Box, Leslie Lewis, Vasuda Sharma, Sid Coutto, Ankur Tiwari, The Other People, and The Whirling Kalapas. Drawing inspiration from great musicians such as Mike Portnoy, Alex Acuna, James Kottak and Giovanni Hidalgo, Kapoor is well versed in a number of percussion styles like the Djembe, Cajon, Timbale and Shakers in addition to the drum kit. He has attended the first annual Dog Camp featuring Mike Portnoy, Billy Shehan and Richie Kotzen in New York in July 2014.

 

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Feel Our Love: The Maria Fernandes Homegoing Fund (Update: Goal Met)

Sources: Legacy of Love (Facebook) | All Things Michael

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On August 25th, we unexpectedly lost fellow Michael Jackson fan and sister, Maria “Jackson” Fernandes. Help us give her a proper homegoing.

On August 25th, Maria ‘Jackson’ Fernandes passed away in her car between working 4 job shifts. Maria was a committed employee, thoughtful friend and a devoted Michael Jackson fan, who lived as he did by giving back to those who was in more need than herself.

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The outpouring of love and support for Maria’s Story has been tremendous and amazing. Because we know so many people want to do something, we have set up a fundraising page. Although we cannot bring Maria back, the least we can do is give her the homegoing she deserves.

All contributions will go to Maria’s final wish of cremation and having her ashes taken to her favorite places including Neverland Ranch and Forest Lawn in California.

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Read more about how you can help

Read more about Maria’s Story:

All Things Michael would like to send love and condolences to the Fernandes and Legacy of Love families. We didn’t know Maria personally, but she sounds like a wonderful and special person who touched many people during her short time on earth. RIP dear one. ♥

Update: 

Michael Jackson’s 12 Best Moments On Stage [Video]

Sources: Vibe Vixen | All Things Michael

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It seems every time we celebrate Michael Jackson’s birthday, a wave of nostalgia for his music takes over. It’s common knowledge that the late icon laid the blueprint for performing with his countless live performances. Although he unexpectedly died in 2009, we still have a rich catalog of his work to enjoy.

Watch 12 of his best moments on stage.

Jackson Five Medley- Motown 25 Medley

“Billie Jean” on Motown 25 Special

“Man In The Mirror/The Way You Make Me Feel” at 1988 Grammy Awards

1993 Superbowl Halftime Show

“Smooth Criminal” at Wembley Stadium (1988)

Jackson Five Reunion at 2001 MSG Concert

“I Want You Back” on The Ed Sullivan Show

“Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’”- 1997 Munich Concert

Medley at 1995 VMA’s

“Dangerous”-1993 American Music Awards

“Remember The Time”- 1993 Soul Train Awards

“Billie Jean” on the 1987 “Bad Tour”

 

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